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Archive for January, 2015

The week in review: Dodoname goes mobile, U.S. president proposes privacy protection, plus data breach updates

The week in review: Dodoname goes mobile, U.S. president proposes privacy protection, plus data breach updates

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. This week, Dodoname went mobile, Obama’s privacy proposition draws cheers and jeers, and data breaches and settlements for same continued to make news. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

Protecting your online privacy: there’s an app for that

‘Round Dodoname HQ, this was a big week. After months of slaving over a hot app store, this week the free Dodoname iOS app was made available on the Apple App Store. Got an iPhone? Like privacy? Then head over to the App Store and download the on-the-go version of our platform.

From the news release:

Whether you’re shopping online, visiting a retailer’s physical store, working or browsing, the situation often arises where you are asked to provide an email address. Perhaps it’s to receive an electronic receipt, take advantage of a special promotion, or sign up for a newsletter.

But providing that email address can easily lead to a flood of annoying and unwanted email solicitations. In some instances, giving out your email address can lead to malicious spam and phishing attacks.

Dodoname puts an end to this privacy abuse.

Imagine going shopping with all your coupons and offers in one convenient app. Use Dodonames to register with your favorite stores or online merchants. The next time you go shopping the old-fashioned way, all your coupons are right there on your mobile device for merchants to scan at checkout. It’s the single best way to interact with any merchant or vendor to get the stuff you want – and only the stuff you want – without giving up your privacy and anonymity.

Early media reports peg the company as “one to watch in 2015” and we’re already getting some great user reviews on the App Store. Want to know what all the fuss is about? Download the app now!

President proposes privacy protection

Last year was a record year for data breaches globally; the U.S. government is not taking this fact lightly. This week, President Obama proposed legislation that would protect consumer privacy and demand disclosure from companies who fail to protect consumer data.

The proposed legislation has been subject to virtual reams of coverage, naturally, and there are proponents and detractors.

The pro side says:

Now, the government may step in, at least to ensure consumers are protected. President Obama on Monday proposed a new law called the Personal Data Notification and Protection Act, which would create a basic set of rules for how companies handle their customer information. It also would criminalize international trade in stolen personal identity information.

Aside from one specific rule that would require companies to notify customers within 30 days of the discovery of a data breach, there aren’t many other details available yet about Obama’s proposal. The president is expected to outline more specifics in his State of the Union speech next week.

In the mean time, tech industry executives and privacy advocates are excited at the prospect of a renewed effort to create a national standard. They say the bills that succeed are typically aimed at the government and how it handles information, rather than corporations.

Now that could change.

“This is a huge shot in the arm to a much-needed advancement for our legislative protections,” said Scott Talbott, who heads up government relations for the trade group Electronic Transactions Association. – From Cnet’s article, “Obama’s data-breach initiative has privacy advocates optimistic, cautious

The con side says:

But the reality is that even if implemented, the proposed legislation and other actions would likely do little to make American companies or individuals safer. The only real benefit is likely to be raising the overall awareness of online vulnerabilities, just as the TSA’s airport security rigmarole may not actually catch weapons or terrorists, but still makes it abundantly clear that aviation is a risky business that needs to be approached with appropriate caution. – From Network World’s article, “Unfortunately, Obama’s new cybersecurity measures won’t help much”

Only time will tell whether this gets passed into law and what impact it will have. In the meantime, savvy consumers can use tools like Dodoname to protect their privacy when interacting with merchants.

Zappos settles for data breach; AMResorts customers report unusual credit card activity

Another week, another slew of data breach news. After suffering a 2012 data breach, Zappos this week settled lawsuits about same, resulting in a modest payout and a commitment to do better in the future. Perhaps a future vision of what AMResorts may need to prepare for given news that consumers who used credit cards on that site reported unusual activity on their cards afterwards.

 

 

Posted in: Blog, Privacy, This week in review

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Dodoname is now mobile

Dodoname is now mobile

Interact with merchants on the go without sacrificing your online privacy

NEW GLASGOW, NS AND OTTAWA ON – January 13, 2015 – Dodoname (www.www.dodoname.com), the world’s first privacy marketing platform, is now available as a free mobile app from Apple’s App Store.

Whether you’re shopping online, visiting a retailer’s physical store, working or browsing, the situation often arises where you are asked to provide an email address. Perhaps it’s to receive an electronic receipt, take advantage of a special promotion, or sign up for a newsletter.

But providing that email address can easily lead to a flood of annoying and unwanted email solicitations. In some instances, giving out your email address can lead to malicious spam and phishing attacks.

Dodoname puts an end to this privacy abuse.

Imagine going shopping with all your coupons and offers in one convenient app. Use Dodonames to register with your favorite stores or online merchants. The next time you go shopping the old-fashioned way, all your coupons are right there on your mobile device for merchants to scan at checkout. It’s the single best way to interact with any merchant or vendor to get the stuff you want – and only the stuff you want – without giving up your privacy and anonymity.

Dodoname launched last fall as a web application. And now it’s now available as a convenient and free mobile app for iOS.

“The Dodoname mobile app is the ideal way to shop and create one-on-one relationships with merchants to get the deals you want,” said Dodoname founder and CEO Michael Gaffney. “In the past, you had to create multiple burner email accounts to preserve some semblance of online privacy. Even then, you still had to provide a lot of personal information about yourself. Dodoname gives you true privacy, without having to jump through hoops, with a simple-to-use app.”

Stay tuned to take advantage of DodoDeals, DodoCoupons and DodoLinks. Beginning next month, Dodoname will not only manage the coupons and offer of your favorite merchants but merchants will put Coupons and Deals directly on Dodoname, making the process of finding good offers even easier. Remember to complete your Persona on the web application to truly take advantage of these new features.

How it works

Consumers can use a Dodoname instead of their real email address for almost any interaction with a merchant or vendor. With your Dodoname account, you can spawn any number of unique Dodonames on the fly that are iterations of your primary Dodoname. For example, if you chose Superwoman as your Dodoname, then superwoman.01@dodoname.com would be the first additional Dodoname spawned, followed by superwoman.02@dodoname.com, and so on.

Use these Dodonames as you would a regular email address, to sign up for offers, register a warranty, receive an e-receipt, download a whitepaper, subscribe to a magazine, or for any other kind of interaction with a merchant or vendor. Your Dodonames are easily managed through one account, with a single dashboard and a single inbox that is accessible through our mobile app and our web application.

Dodonames can be made to go extinct after a single use, after a specific period, or on command at any time. In this way, consumers retain complete control over how, when, where – or even if – merchants can communicate with them, and can drop merchants at any time with an absolute guarantee they will never hear from them again.

Existing Dodoname users can access their accounts through the mobile app using their current login. For new users, all you need to do to get started is download the app to your device and create and validate your account with a few simple steps.

Download the iOS Dodoname app today at https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/dodoname-love-your-privacy/id943964384?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

An Android version of the mobile app is coming soon.

Have questions? See if we have the answer on at www.www.dodoname.com/faq.

About Dodoname

Dodoname (www.dodoname.com) is world’s the first privacy marketing platform. Consumers can spawn new Dodonames on the fly, use them in place of an email address for almost any merchant interaction, and make them go extinct at any time. With Dodoname, consumers can take complete control of their online identity to confidently interact with merchants, without ever revealing who they really are. Face your inbox without fear of unwanted offers and other spam.

For more information, or to arrange an interview, please contact:

Leo Valiquette

+1 613 769 9479

Email: leo@leovaliquette.com

Twitter: @leovaliquette

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The week in review: the FTC on IoT at CES, ringing in a new year of data breaches and phishing scams

The week in review: the FTC on IoT at CES, ringing in a new year of data breaches and phishing scams

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. This week, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas highlighted the growing interest in privacy as well as the privacy impacts of the Internet of Things, ringing in the new year of data breaches, and new phishing schemes for a new year. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

The FTC on IoT + CES = big privacy news

This week, technology companies big and small gathered in Las Vegas to tout their wares and reveal to consumers worldwide the next wave of consumer electronics. At the Consumer Electronics Show 2015, privacy was big news, both on the show floor and on the main stage.

The Internet of Things is a hot topic these days: from connected smoke alarms to intelligent refrigerators, futurists – and technology companies – are betting on the fact that soon most of our world will be connected to the Internet. This brave new world, however, has serious implications for consumer privacy.

The chairwoman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission gave a keynote address at CES this week highlighting the privacy and security implications of IoT, and her speech got a lot of coverage in both tech and mainstream media.

“Connected devices that provide increased convenience and improve health services are also collecting, transmitting, storing, and often sharing vast amounts of consumer data, some of it highly personal, thereby creating a number of privacy risks,” she said.

This creates an opportunity, of course, for technology companies to help solve those challenges, as evidenced by the small but mighty group of privacy-focused technology providers exhibiting on the CES show floor.

Brace for a busy year of data breaches

2014 was a remarkable year for data breaches, with seemingly no corner of the retail and consumer worlds untouched by the hand of hackers and poor security systems and policies. Well, I’ve got some bad news for you: experts are predicting that 2015 could be even worse. From the Sony hack that arguably touched off international cyberwar at a magnitude never before seen to financial institutions and retail giants suffering legal action and penalties as an unprecedented rate, these are just the tip of the iceberg for what could be about to unfold in 2015.

As Forbes reported in its harbinger of the data breach potential for 2015: “…a recent study found that more than 40% of companies experienced a data breach of some sort in the past year – four out of ten companies that maintain your credit card numbers, social security numbers, health information, and other personal information.  That number is staggering, and shows no signs of retreat.”

Fast food restaurant Chick-Fil-A (which has had troubles of a different sort in recent years based on its political and religious affiliations) has the dubious distinction of being the first reported data breach of 2015. Congratulations?

What’s good on Netflix? Not the phish. Try Friends instead.

Online streaming service Netflix has fallen victim to one of the first reported phishing scams of 2015. Netflix subscribers are being targeted with the old account verification phishing scheme. Some subscribers are reporting receiving notification that their payment has failed and that they need to log in to provide updated payment details. Let’s resolve to try and not fall victim to these sorts of tactics in 2015, shall we?

 

Posted in: Blog, Data breach, Phishing, Privacy, This week in review

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Classic relationship marketing diminishes the privacy of the consumer

Classic relationship marketing diminishes the privacy of the consumer

By Michael Gaffney

Privacy research firm, Pew Research, in the “The Future of Privacy” reported that ‘Internet privacy is a fantasy’ and that 55 percent of the population don’t believe that a ‘privacy-rights infrastructure by 2025 that allows for business innovation and monetization while also offering individuals choices for protecting their personal information in easy-to-use formats’ is achievable. We all need to remember that the remaining 45 percent is still a very large number.

Most disruptive events, political, social or technological, come from a tiny percentage of the population evoking a cause or an entrepreneur creating something new and needed. Dr. Martin Luther King and Steve Jobs were but two people in that 45 percent determined to make a change and they were quite disruptive to say the least. The doom and gloom naysayers who write provocative headlines like ‘privacy is a fantasy’ should provide motivation for the 45 percent who are concerned about privacy.

Relationship marketing is a relatively new phenomenon. It evolved out of the 1960’s when consumers began to have more competitive product alternatives to choose from and where there was sustained demand for those products. Merchants had to change from being focusing on the economics of supply to focus on demand. The foundations of what came to be known as relationship marketing – customer recruitment, retention and satisfaction – became the dominant focus of marketers for the past 50 years.

However, relationship marketing has seriously diminished privacy of the consumer. Why? Because by definition a ‘relationship’ typically means some form of intimate knowledge of the other party – in this case the consumer. In marketing terms, it means that the merchant, to effectively market to a consumer, needs lots of information about that consumer. Consumer data is captured, typically without prior knowledge or consent, in a number of ways by merchants. Facebook, Google and other social media sites have only accelerated the loss of privacy. Moreover, corporate customer relationship management (CRM) systems appear to be failing regularly in terms of data breaches and CRM’s are the key repositories of customer information.

So, what are consumers to do given all the scraping of our private information and the data breaches from CRM’s? Privacy and security have been foundations of society as long as we humans have been on the planet. Privacy is complex. We want privacy from our governments; privacy from the prying eyes of the public – especially if you are famous; privacy and protection from the bad guys; and privacy and protection from the merchants that hound us. Dodoname was created to address privacy from merchants and other consumer to business transactions and help address the risk of your data being stolen in a data breach.

How does Dodoname resolve relationship marketing and the loss of privacy? First of all, we designed a system that starts with the consumer in control of their personal and private information. Second, we designed a system that does not even capture your private information – only personal information. What is the difference between private and personal information? Private information is your actual name, street address, telephone number, credit card and banking information. Personal information is your sex, age (not birth date), postal code, married/single, likes, hobbies, etc. At Dodoname, we call the collection of your personal information your Persona. Remember, your Persona never includes your private information. Marketers don’t really need your private information if they have your Persona information. Hackers can hack us all they want but they can’t get what we don’t have. Relationship marketing and its problems with privacy breaches is solved when Consumers use Dodonames and Merchants market to Dodonames.

(Image: Flickr, Bernard Goldbach, link)

 

 

 

 

 

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