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Use Dodoname to Stop Phishing Attacks. | phishing, privacy, email

Use Dodoname to Stop Phishing Attacks. | phishing, privacy, email

“A woman in the UK has been scammed out of her life savings through a simple phishing email orchestrated by cyber criminals.” Yahoo June 29, 2015.

On March 19 I wrote a blog – ‘Identity theft and who has the keys to your virtual house?’ It was inspired by a story about a neighbor of mine who was about to make the same terrible mistake as this unfortunate woman in the UK.

Creating a Dodoname account and using a Dodoname email address could have eliminated the phishing problem in both cases. Phishers endeavor make themselves look like a legitimate enterprise that you would normally transact business with – such as your bank or eBay. The first key to the phisher is to get your email address. Once they have your email address they can try to insert themselves into your daily communications by mimicking the legitimate business and eventually trying to gain your trust and trick you into handing over money or private information.

Using a Dodoname email address would have gone a long way to stopping the risk of these phishing attacks – and other invasions of your privacy. Your first line of defence against phishers is to use a Dodoname email address whenever you register for any online service. Because of Dodoname’s ‘matched sender’ feature, a phishers’ attempt to use this email would simply fail. A Dodoname email address is of no use to phishers, spammers, and scammers. Not only does Dodoname give you have privacy and freedom on the Internet but your inbox gets dramatically cleaned out of spam.

Remember, never give out your real email address again – use a Dodoname email address. Dodoname is you personal privacy manager.

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9 Dodoname Privacy Protection Tips for Online Daters

9 Dodoname Privacy Protection Tips for Online Daters
  1. Never share your first or last name, telephone number, address, place of work, or any other personally identifiable information.
  2. Share information about yourself without providing specifics that could allow somebody to identify you.
  3. Ensure that any digital photos that you post do not have metadata in them.
  4. Always pick a different username between different dating sites and never reuse a username between personal/business sites and a dating site.
  5. Always read the privacy policy.  Leave the site if you don’t like what you read.
  6. Always review and change the default settings and filters on the dating site and set up the controls that meet your needs. Assume the default settings are never they way you want them to be.
  7. Never ever send money.
  8. Fabricated information on a resume is an unfortunate fact and the same happens on a dating site. Do whatever you can to validate or background check before you meet someone.
  9. Always use Dodonames. Never use your regular email address.

Posted in: Anonymity, Identity, Online Dating, Privacy

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Focus your email to protect your privacy and stay safe online.

Focus your email to protect your privacy and stay safe online.

If you are concerned about identify theft and other privacy/security concerns there is a simple email precaution you can take to protect yourself. How about – never give out your personal or business email to someone or business you don’t know?

Sounds like common sense, does it not – yet, we do it all the time! Every day we sign up for newsletters; give our email to a point of sale clerk; register for online dating; use it to get WiFi at the coffee shop or airport; register for coupons, daily deal sites and freely hand out our email address in many other situations where we don’t know the people or business. Don’t do it! Protect your privacy and stop identity theft.

Never give your personal or business email address to people or businesses you don’t know. Privacy invasions and identity theft, in most cases, start with an email address. Your personal or business email address is the key to the front door of your digital house.  Why would you ever share that key with every supplier you can think of and risk identity theft?

Little Known Fact About the Selling of Email Addresses.

Many companies have no problem selling email addresses while at the same time agreeing not to spam you. You unsubscribe from their mailing list but not from their selling list! Conclusion: Protect your privacy, don’t let your personal email get on their list in the first place

However easy it is to say, ‘never share your email with people and businesses you don’t know’, in reality we actually need to maintain a digital communications with many of these folks. Many of us simply create another email address, ‘our spam address’, in gmail, yahoo or hotmail.  We end up with another inbox that is full of spam and also contains lots of legitimate communication.

Dodoname – Privacy by Design.

Enter Dodoname, which was designed specifically for when you don’t want to use your regular email address and also want a way to start, manage and stop all these ‘other emails’.

Remember, stop identity theft, never give out your regular email address again to someone to don’t know – use a Dodoname.

Posted in: Anonymity, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Privacy, Uncategorized

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The Right to Know When I Am Not Left Alone – Is Not Enough.

The Right to Know When I Am Not Left Alone – Is Not Enough.

Our online privacy is continuously compromised with the scanning, skimming and scraping of our emails and our browsing behavior.

A recent study concluded that 92% of the population believes “that collecting the content of emails is unacceptable”. How many consumers understand that virtually every email is scanned, skimmed and scraped for information and their privacy is breached every day? A recent article in The Economist describes how people do not protect their right to privacy and anonymity.

Google scans the content of all emails on its servers as well as all emails sent or received by a gmail account. Google considers that users have no ‘reasonable expectation’ of privacy. This stance flies in the face of the predominant and consistent research about consumers’ ‘privacy expectations’.

Rami Essaid recently wrote in TechCrunch that, “The truth is, people will never achieve true privacy and anonymity online.” He concludes that tracking is here to stay and that it is getting more pervasive and sophisticated. His main thesis is that our discussion should not be about absolute the right to privacy or anonymity but about transparency.

If Essaid is correct, the horse has left the barn in terms of protecting our privacy and anonymity. Instead, he proposes focusing on making it visible and transparent about how our online privacy will be accessed or ripped off.  It is OK to to invade our privacy as long as it is transparent! Should consumers simply give up that they have any expectation for online privacy? This is almost Orwellian in concept – a dark road that we must not travel as this means that others have the right to observe us without our consent!

The Right to Privacy

In 1890, Warren and Brandeis wrote The Right to Privacy and their key argument was the “right to be let alone”. Here we are 100 years later. Do we really want to change the right to be left alone to the “the right to know when I am not left alone?” Transparency is an important need but we must not give up the fight for the right to privacy.

Posted in: Anonymity, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Phishing, Privacy, Uncategorized

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Identity theft and who has the keys to your virtual house?

Identity theft and who has the keys to your virtual house?

We were moving out of the neighborhood where we have lived for the past 23 years. Tracy, our neighbor, invited us over for a farewell dinner.  Tracy knows that I have been in technology for a long time and related the story of her recent identity theft where the thieves came very close to emptying her bank account. It started with the bad guys phishing and finding her personal email address. This data breach and cybercrime was incredibly invasive to Tracy as she now had to get rid of the personal email address she had used for over twenty years.

 

The front door to our virtual house, hence our privacy, is our personal email address. It seems we give this email address to everybody. Concerned about their privacy, many consumers simply get a second or third email they use as their ‘spam address’ – typically a Hotmail or Gmail address. So now we have two or three front doors to our virtual house. Susie Baszkeiwicz blogged in January about 9 reasons you should have more than one email address. Avoid spam & hackers, protect yourself, have a disposable email, have an alias and have a backup are 5 of her 9 reasons that we built Dodoname.

How many of us would hand out the keys to our front, side and back door of our regular house to every merchant or supplier who said, “I won’t sell to you unless you give me the keys to your house.” If that seems a little insane in the real world then why do we do it in the virtual world?

Consider that identify theft is a Type I invasion of our privacy and that spam is a Type II invasion of our privacy. Clearly a Type I privacy breach is more serious than Type II privacy breach.

For Type I protection most consumers continue to use their personal email address – the less secure email address. Why? Because there is no easy way to manage our secondary emails, which are filled with spam, and not really the place we want to collect and manager our ‘good’ communications. We shrug our shoulders and continue to use our personal email addresses for the really important stuff. The phishers know this. Consumers should understand what phishing is and how to protect themselves. Read this article from the Safety & Security Center at Microsoft for more information about how to protect yourself.

Using a Dodoname for key confidential registrations would eliminate much of the risk because a Dodoname can only ever be used by that one service. Moreover, the managed email system in Dodoname provides users with a powerful way to store and manage confidential communications. Finally, Dodoname is also designed as a marketplace where merchants and consumers can meet, sell and buy with confidence that the consumer’s private information is protected. Privacy with Personalization is the core architectural feature of Dodoname. Everyone should have a Dodoname.

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2015 is the year of the sheep. And of personalization.

2015 is the year of the sheep. And of personalization.

2015 is the year of the sheep, according to the Chinese zodiac. And it’s also the year of personalization, according to several authors (DeGiovanni, Holobach, Ballance, Shandwick). The imagery of too many merchants treating their consumers like sheep is compelling. Chinese New Year was only a few weeks ago so marketers should make a resolution to stop treating their customers like sheep.

Too often, we consumers feel like we are just another one, an invisible consumer, a sheep. What we really want is to feel like we are the one, the only. Even just a little different would be fine. Consumer oneness is the core of personalization.

Personalization is hard. There are so many sheep that need to be categorized that most marketers simply give in to batch and blast email marketing. Of course, the sheep metaphor is demeaning to consumers but even more demeaning is for marketers to treat us like sheep.

Consumer personalization is hard because of the almost infinite number of individual differences between consumers. Trying to solve for infinity is intractable – a boil-the-ocean problem. Any sales pitch from a personalization product supplier promising ‘the’ solution is simply false.

Marketers should focus on a bite-sized personalization problem to start with, and expand or change as solutions reveal their efficacy. Moreover, this approach reduces costs, risks and provides flexibility and adaptability. What would be your choice of message to the C-suite; “We’re locked in to this solution,” or, “We’re adapting as we go”? Your efficacy as a marketer is closely aligned to your tenure with the firm.

Capturing actionable data about consumers is the marketer’s Holy Grail. Primary data where information about a consumer is generated by and shared by the consumers themselves is invaluable compared to secondary scraped data sources. Battlefield data is always superior to boardroom data. Primary data directly from a consumer implies that the consumer is in control. Give consumers direct control over their own information and the sheep become wolves. This is a big-time move up the food chain for a marketer.

The Dodoname consumer Persona is designed to provide marketers with primary data. In Dodoname, the consumer is motivated to provide this information because of the inherent reward structure built into the system. Dodoname guarantees the privacy of the consumer with the currency for that privacy being the completion of their Persona. It’s a win-win for the sheep turned to wolf consumers because they can “Get the stuff they want without revealing who they are.”

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Personalization is more powerful than intrusive batch-and-blast ecommerce

Personalization is more powerful than intrusive batch-and-blast ecommerce

By Michael Gaffney

The demise of batch-and-blast ecommerce has been foretold by several writers – Davidson and Senne, among others – over the past 24 months. However, our inboxes are still being filled with emailed offers from senders without any differentiation. You get the same offer as I do, and so do innumerable other folks. Hence the term batch and blast.

Merchants that are still practicing batch-and-blast ecommerce solutions are in danger. If your reputation as a merchant is important, then recognize that sender-reputation algorithms are becoming more and more vigilant at identifying batch-and-blast spam. The poorer the targeting and personalization of your online communications with consumers, the lower your online reputation scores.

The question has to be asked: Why are merchants still using batch and blast? The answer is simple: Because it’s easy to do, and there are a ton of resources already built and ready to deliver this solution.

To attract highly valued customers, merchants are turning to the tremendous growth in online shopping and the various products that help promote and sell their products. Merchants must convert searches to web visits, web visits to shopping carts and shopping carts to purchases. All along the buying journey, they also must create stronger customer loyalty, accelerate repeat purchases, retain customers and, most importantly, have a customer-conquest strategy.

The key to moving away from batch and blast is personalization. Currently, personalization on the web is considered to be the tailoring of pages to individual users’ characteristics or preferences. However, the source of data about users’ characteristics or preferences are, in large part, the numerous information-scraping tools that watch and monitor your browsing behaviour. Security software vendor Sentor estimates that 23% of total web traffic is now related to information scraping. This number is shocking in its size. But it is also interesting because it indicates the high demand for information about consumers that is required to support personalization efforts.

Most of the information collected by information scraping is secondary data. By contrast, merchants are mainly interested in primary data. I won’t get into the benefits and differences between primary and secondary data.; it’s enough to say that the more primary data available to a merchant, the better the personalization.

Dodoname was designed to be a primary-data-personalization solution. The consumer’s Dodoname Persona is completed directly by the consumer. The meta data of their purchasing behaviour inside the Dodoname application of clicks, favourites, purchases and shares is another source of powerful primary data. With Dodoname, merchants can seamlessly move from batch and blast to personalization and more successful ecommerce because Dodoname was designed as a marketing and sales platform to take consumers from promotion through to converting shopping baskets.

(Image: flickr, Alone by Paul Friel, link.)

Posted in: Blog, Persona

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The week in review: Dodoname goes mobile, U.S. president proposes privacy protection, plus data breach updates

The week in review: Dodoname goes mobile, U.S. president proposes privacy protection, plus data breach updates

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. This week, Dodoname went mobile, Obama’s privacy proposition draws cheers and jeers, and data breaches and settlements for same continued to make news. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

Protecting your online privacy: there’s an app for that

‘Round Dodoname HQ, this was a big week. After months of slaving over a hot app store, this week the free Dodoname iOS app was made available on the Apple App Store. Got an iPhone? Like privacy? Then head over to the App Store and download the on-the-go version of our platform.

From the news release:

Whether you’re shopping online, visiting a retailer’s physical store, working or browsing, the situation often arises where you are asked to provide an email address. Perhaps it’s to receive an electronic receipt, take advantage of a special promotion, or sign up for a newsletter.

But providing that email address can easily lead to a flood of annoying and unwanted email solicitations. In some instances, giving out your email address can lead to malicious spam and phishing attacks.

Dodoname puts an end to this privacy abuse.

Imagine going shopping with all your coupons and offers in one convenient app. Use Dodonames to register with your favorite stores or online merchants. The next time you go shopping the old-fashioned way, all your coupons are right there on your mobile device for merchants to scan at checkout. It’s the single best way to interact with any merchant or vendor to get the stuff you want – and only the stuff you want – without giving up your privacy and anonymity.

Early media reports peg the company as “one to watch in 2015” and we’re already getting some great user reviews on the App Store. Want to know what all the fuss is about? Download the app now!

President proposes privacy protection

Last year was a record year for data breaches globally; the U.S. government is not taking this fact lightly. This week, President Obama proposed legislation that would protect consumer privacy and demand disclosure from companies who fail to protect consumer data.

The proposed legislation has been subject to virtual reams of coverage, naturally, and there are proponents and detractors.

The pro side says:

Now, the government may step in, at least to ensure consumers are protected. President Obama on Monday proposed a new law called the Personal Data Notification and Protection Act, which would create a basic set of rules for how companies handle their customer information. It also would criminalize international trade in stolen personal identity information.

Aside from one specific rule that would require companies to notify customers within 30 days of the discovery of a data breach, there aren’t many other details available yet about Obama’s proposal. The president is expected to outline more specifics in his State of the Union speech next week.

In the mean time, tech industry executives and privacy advocates are excited at the prospect of a renewed effort to create a national standard. They say the bills that succeed are typically aimed at the government and how it handles information, rather than corporations.

Now that could change.

“This is a huge shot in the arm to a much-needed advancement for our legislative protections,” said Scott Talbott, who heads up government relations for the trade group Electronic Transactions Association. – From Cnet’s article, “Obama’s data-breach initiative has privacy advocates optimistic, cautious

The con side says:

But the reality is that even if implemented, the proposed legislation and other actions would likely do little to make American companies or individuals safer. The only real benefit is likely to be raising the overall awareness of online vulnerabilities, just as the TSA’s airport security rigmarole may not actually catch weapons or terrorists, but still makes it abundantly clear that aviation is a risky business that needs to be approached with appropriate caution. – From Network World’s article, “Unfortunately, Obama’s new cybersecurity measures won’t help much”

Only time will tell whether this gets passed into law and what impact it will have. In the meantime, savvy consumers can use tools like Dodoname to protect their privacy when interacting with merchants.

Zappos settles for data breach; AMResorts customers report unusual credit card activity

Another week, another slew of data breach news. After suffering a 2012 data breach, Zappos this week settled lawsuits about same, resulting in a modest payout and a commitment to do better in the future. Perhaps a future vision of what AMResorts may need to prepare for given news that consumers who used credit cards on that site reported unusual activity on their cards afterwards.

 

 

Posted in: Blog, Privacy, This week in review

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Dodoname is now mobile

Dodoname is now mobile

Interact with merchants on the go without sacrificing your online privacy

NEW GLASGOW, NS AND OTTAWA ON – January 13, 2015 – Dodoname (www.www.dodoname.com), the world’s first privacy marketing platform, is now available as a free mobile app from Apple’s App Store.

Whether you’re shopping online, visiting a retailer’s physical store, working or browsing, the situation often arises where you are asked to provide an email address. Perhaps it’s to receive an electronic receipt, take advantage of a special promotion, or sign up for a newsletter.

But providing that email address can easily lead to a flood of annoying and unwanted email solicitations. In some instances, giving out your email address can lead to malicious spam and phishing attacks.

Dodoname puts an end to this privacy abuse.

Imagine going shopping with all your coupons and offers in one convenient app. Use Dodonames to register with your favorite stores or online merchants. The next time you go shopping the old-fashioned way, all your coupons are right there on your mobile device for merchants to scan at checkout. It’s the single best way to interact with any merchant or vendor to get the stuff you want – and only the stuff you want – without giving up your privacy and anonymity.

Dodoname launched last fall as a web application. And now it’s now available as a convenient and free mobile app for iOS.

“The Dodoname mobile app is the ideal way to shop and create one-on-one relationships with merchants to get the deals you want,” said Dodoname founder and CEO Michael Gaffney. “In the past, you had to create multiple burner email accounts to preserve some semblance of online privacy. Even then, you still had to provide a lot of personal information about yourself. Dodoname gives you true privacy, without having to jump through hoops, with a simple-to-use app.”

Stay tuned to take advantage of DodoDeals, DodoCoupons and DodoLinks. Beginning next month, Dodoname will not only manage the coupons and offer of your favorite merchants but merchants will put Coupons and Deals directly on Dodoname, making the process of finding good offers even easier. Remember to complete your Persona on the web application to truly take advantage of these new features.

How it works

Consumers can use a Dodoname instead of their real email address for almost any interaction with a merchant or vendor. With your Dodoname account, you can spawn any number of unique Dodonames on the fly that are iterations of your primary Dodoname. For example, if you chose Superwoman as your Dodoname, then superwoman.01@dodoname.com would be the first additional Dodoname spawned, followed by superwoman.02@dodoname.com, and so on.

Use these Dodonames as you would a regular email address, to sign up for offers, register a warranty, receive an e-receipt, download a whitepaper, subscribe to a magazine, or for any other kind of interaction with a merchant or vendor. Your Dodonames are easily managed through one account, with a single dashboard and a single inbox that is accessible through our mobile app and our web application.

Dodonames can be made to go extinct after a single use, after a specific period, or on command at any time. In this way, consumers retain complete control over how, when, where – or even if – merchants can communicate with them, and can drop merchants at any time with an absolute guarantee they will never hear from them again.

Existing Dodoname users can access their accounts through the mobile app using their current login. For new users, all you need to do to get started is download the app to your device and create and validate your account with a few simple steps.

Download the iOS Dodoname app today at https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/dodoname-love-your-privacy/id943964384?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

An Android version of the mobile app is coming soon.

Have questions? See if we have the answer on at www.www.dodoname.com/faq.

About Dodoname

Dodoname (www.dodoname.com) is world’s the first privacy marketing platform. Consumers can spawn new Dodonames on the fly, use them in place of an email address for almost any merchant interaction, and make them go extinct at any time. With Dodoname, consumers can take complete control of their online identity to confidently interact with merchants, without ever revealing who they really are. Face your inbox without fear of unwanted offers and other spam.

For more information, or to arrange an interview, please contact:

Leo Valiquette

+1 613 769 9479

Email: leo@leovaliquette.com

Twitter: @leovaliquette

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The week in review: the FTC on IoT at CES, ringing in a new year of data breaches and phishing scams

The week in review: the FTC on IoT at CES, ringing in a new year of data breaches and phishing scams

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. This week, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas highlighted the growing interest in privacy as well as the privacy impacts of the Internet of Things, ringing in the new year of data breaches, and new phishing schemes for a new year. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

The FTC on IoT + CES = big privacy news

This week, technology companies big and small gathered in Las Vegas to tout their wares and reveal to consumers worldwide the next wave of consumer electronics. At the Consumer Electronics Show 2015, privacy was big news, both on the show floor and on the main stage.

The Internet of Things is a hot topic these days: from connected smoke alarms to intelligent refrigerators, futurists – and technology companies – are betting on the fact that soon most of our world will be connected to the Internet. This brave new world, however, has serious implications for consumer privacy.

The chairwoman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission gave a keynote address at CES this week highlighting the privacy and security implications of IoT, and her speech got a lot of coverage in both tech and mainstream media.

“Connected devices that provide increased convenience and improve health services are also collecting, transmitting, storing, and often sharing vast amounts of consumer data, some of it highly personal, thereby creating a number of privacy risks,” she said.

This creates an opportunity, of course, for technology companies to help solve those challenges, as evidenced by the small but mighty group of privacy-focused technology providers exhibiting on the CES show floor.

Brace for a busy year of data breaches

2014 was a remarkable year for data breaches, with seemingly no corner of the retail and consumer worlds untouched by the hand of hackers and poor security systems and policies. Well, I’ve got some bad news for you: experts are predicting that 2015 could be even worse. From the Sony hack that arguably touched off international cyberwar at a magnitude never before seen to financial institutions and retail giants suffering legal action and penalties as an unprecedented rate, these are just the tip of the iceberg for what could be about to unfold in 2015.

As Forbes reported in its harbinger of the data breach potential for 2015: “…a recent study found that more than 40% of companies experienced a data breach of some sort in the past year – four out of ten companies that maintain your credit card numbers, social security numbers, health information, and other personal information.  That number is staggering, and shows no signs of retreat.”

Fast food restaurant Chick-Fil-A (which has had troubles of a different sort in recent years based on its political and religious affiliations) has the dubious distinction of being the first reported data breach of 2015. Congratulations?

What’s good on Netflix? Not the phish. Try Friends instead.

Online streaming service Netflix has fallen victim to one of the first reported phishing scams of 2015. Netflix subscribers are being targeted with the old account verification phishing scheme. Some subscribers are reporting receiving notification that their payment has failed and that they need to log in to provide updated payment details. Let’s resolve to try and not fall victim to these sorts of tactics in 2015, shall we?

 

Posted in: Blog, Data breach, Phishing, Privacy, This week in review

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