Blog

This week in review: Cybersecurity as child’s play, travel advisory, and fresh phish

This week in review: Cybersecurity as child’s play, travel advisory, and fresh phish

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. Catching our attention this week were posts about cybersecurity being child’s play, travellers targeted by cybercriminals, and plenty of fresh phishing news. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

Reading, writing and cybersecurity

The hot ticket these days isn’t to InfoSec Taylor Swift, it’s to see eight-year old cybersecurity expert and startup CEO Reuben Paul. This pint-sized infosec phenom is in high demand, speaking at numerous infosec conferences, sharing his message that cybersecurity is an important skill set to be teaching younger generations. To learn more about his perspective – and his busy speaking schedule – read this Q&A.

Travelers get more than free continental breakfast

Several stories in the news this week may prompt you to opt for a staycation rather than travel next time you’re contemplating leaving home. From booking your trip to logging on when you’re at the hotel, cybercriminals are one step ahead.

Booking.com, a highly trafficked online travel booking site, admitted that more than 10,000 of its users had been targeted in an email phishing scam. That booking confirmation email you received, seemingly from Booking.com or the hotel itself, and its request for a deposit to hold the reservation? It’s a scam. The site’s PR team went into defence mode, stating that “this was no data breach and that phishing is an industry-wide phenomenon,” while an infosec blogger posited another, more frightening possibility: “Maybe nobody knows how this happened.”

Meanwhile, business travelers in Asia have been targeted in another type of cybersecurity attack. And I mean targeted. Security advisors suspect that the attacks were targeting specific travellers and may have even had those targets’ itineraries. That’s how it started, but the attacks appear to have broadened and vulnerabilities may have impacted anyone connecting to hotel wifi. As is so often the case, phishing appears to have been a primary vector for delivery of these attacks.

It pays to be hypervigilant when booking and using wifi at hotels; give them your Dodoname instead of your email address!

Fresh phish

This week’s phishing news includes a bleak Outlook, a Google report shining a light on just how effective these scams are, and the full extent of the Home Depot breach that brought Christmas early for potential phishing scammers.

Bad news: Your Microsoft Outlook has been infected with a Trojan virus! At least that’s what the phishing scam in inboxes this week declared. Just click on the link in the very legitimate-looking email from Windows Microsoft to run the Norton antivirus software and eliminate the c93 virus from your mailbox; failing to do so will result in the deactivation of your mailbox. What is actually happening is that by following the steps in the email, you’re handing your Outlook credentials to cybercriminals. And recipients are clicking on these nefarious links much more frequently than you’d think, according to a recent report by Google.

Phishing scams are wildly successful, which is why they continue to plague our inboxes. Google has conducted some fascinating and terrifying research into what they’ve dubbed “manual hijacking,” a primary vector for which is phishing. The results are staggering – phishing emails were effective between three and 45 percent of the time. Of those who clicked on phishing links, 14 percent entered personal data like login credentials or credit card information. These stats are very alarming when you consider the number of personal records taken in some of the recent data breaches.

Listen closely. Do you hear it? That faint sound you hear is that of countless hackers thanking their lucky stars for the phishing bounty they’ve received from the likes of Home Depot. Home Depot has been on the PR campaign trail, trying to clean up the mess of the much-publicized data breaches that company has experienced. One consumer and journalist who had her details exposed in the breach shared the contents of an email that Home Depot sent out to those affected. In that email, the director of corporate communications for the company threw its loyalty program partners under the bus as the weak link in the data security chain, and let recipients know that theirs were just one of 53 million – more than the entire population of Canada! – email addresses compromised, followed by some tips and tricks for avoiding phishing scams.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as they say. Should have used Dodoname!

Posted in: Blog, Phishing, Privacy, This week in review

Leave a Comment (0) →

Who killed online privacy?

Who killed online privacy?

There it was in black and white, announced by CNN (and others) in 2013 for all the world to see: Online privacy is dead. There’s no denying it; if it’s on the Internet, it’s not private.

Like a good game of Clue, let’s tackle this “murder mystery” one suspect at a time. Instead of Colonel Mustard in the library with a candlestick, we’ll determine whether it was the NSA that dealt the killing blow. Or maybe it was Facebook? Or was it our own FOMO (fear of missing out) that inspired the oversharing that took down the whole online privacy paradigm?

The suspects

1. The National Security Agency, or NSA

In September 2013, PC Magazine declared, “Privacy is dead. The NSA killed it. Now what?

Case closed?

Let’s back up a little. For those of you just crawling out from under a rock, tremendous waves were made when now-exiled privacy freedom fighter and/or betrayer of the U.S. (depending on who you ask) former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked classified documents outlining the extent of governmental surveillance of the U.S. public. The NSA itself dates back to the early 1950s, and, according to Wikipedia, is “a U.S. intelligence agency responsible for global monitoring, collection, decoding, translation and analysis of information and data for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes.” But when Snowden exposed the degree to which the organization was extending its mandate into the activities of John Q. Public, the proverbial something hit the something else. Personal data galore was compromised and exposed, and people were not happy about it. Not at all.

Bottom line, according to the reporter who wrote the article?

“There’s nothing you or I can do to put the genie back in the bottle. Universal electronic surveillance is here to stay, and we haven’t seen everything yet.”

Sounds pretty bleak. But is it an open-and-shut case? Is there more than a shadow of a doubt that it was the NSA that did it? Let’s examine the other suspects.

2. Facebook

Where to begin? It seems that Facebook has been slowly and methodically injuring online privacy since it came on the scene, or at least that’s what this Wikipedia entry about Facebook privacy concerns argues. It’s a veritable laundry list of offences:
• Exposure of member information
• Cooperation with government search requests
• Complaint from the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic about 22 breaches of the Canadian Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act
• Data mining
• Inability to voluntarily terminate accounts
• Etc.
• Etc.

It doesn’t sound good.

But maybe we all share some of the blame. Let’s see: perhaps it was…

3. All of us and our darned oversharing.

Forbes, in an article called “Privacy is completely and utterly dead and we killed it,” doesn’t leave much room for interpretation of the article headline.

We’re a bunch of privacy dummies, unaware yet steaming mad (or entirely indifferent) about the state of our online privacy.

From the article:

“Most people don’t even know what information they are giving up or to whom. For example, in their recent Privacy Index, EMC found that 51% of respondents were not willing to give up their personal information for a better experience (27% were), however, how many of these people realize that they are already doing this multiple times over every single day? In fact it’s safe to say that if you want privacy then you probably shouldn’t be using the internet or own a cell phone.”

Just yesterday, the New York Times reported on the latest Pew research results under the headline, “Americans say they want privacy, but act as if they don’t.”

The verdict

The jury’s still out. There’s still hope! There’s another side to this issue, it’s not all doom and gloom. The WIRED article Why privacy is actually thriving online explores the flipside of this argument and next week, we will too.

In a future post, we’ll explore the idea – and the evidence — that online privacy isn’t dead after all, that, in fact, it’s alive and well. Dodoname is in the business of privacy and so we feel strongly that informed consumers can protect their online privacy with our platform. And we’ll explain how online privacy is far from the victim of Miss Scarlett in the conservatory.

(Image: Flickr, DonkeyHotey, link)

Posted in: #TBT, Blog, Privacy

Leave a Comment (0) →

Data brokers: a threat to your online privacy

Data brokers: a threat to your online privacy

By Don Dobson

Two facts have collided in the early days of this millennium: one, much of our lives has gone digital and two, digital security measures have not kept pace with technological advancements and adoption. This is a huge problem.

Our commerce, work, social life, entertainment, information consumption and personal communication have all become digitized. Much of everyday life has either moved online or is touched in some way by our online activity, creating a stream of data coined by Google as our “digital exhaust.”

Secondly, not just laws and regulations but even broad social consensus around issues of security and privacy are falling behind the technological curve and the ever increasing collection capabilities for our data.

Consumer advocates and organizations like the American Civil Liberties Union are sounding the alarm on an industry many consider out of control. Its new video, Invasion of the Data Snatchers, paints a scary, dystopian view of our personal lives under scrutiny by governments and corporations. The intro to the video on their YouTube channel notes New technologies are making it easier for private companies and the government to learn about everything we do – in our homes, in our cars, in stores, and within our communities. As they collect vast amounts of data about us, things are getting truly spooky!

So, who is vacuuming up this so-called digital exhaust? One set of players in that business that few people know about and fewer still understand are “data brokers.” Pam Dixon is the executive director of the World Privacy Forum and her December 18, 2013 testimony before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, titled What Information Do Data Brokers Have on Consumers, and How Do They Use It?, sheds full light on a growing industry with somewhere around 4,000 companies. Dixon asked:

What do a retired librarian in Wisconsin in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, a police officer, and a mother in Texas have in common? The answer is that all were victims of consumer data brokers. Data brokers collect, compile, buy and sell personally identifiable information about who we are, what we do, and much of our “digital exhaust.” 

We are their business models. The police officer was “uncovered” by a data broker who revealed his family information online, jeopardizing his safety. The mother was a victim of domestic violence who was deeply concerned about people finder web sites that published and sold her home address online. The librarian lost her life savings and retirement because a data broker put her on an eager elderly buyer and frequent donor list. She was deluged with predatory offers.

[Consumers] not able to escape from the activities of data brokers…until this Committee started its work, this entire industry largely escaped public scrutiny… Consumers have no effective rights because there is no legal framework that requires data brokers to offer consumers an opt-out or any other rights.

Frank Pasquale, a professor of law at the University of Maryland, is the author of the forthcoming book, “The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information.” He writes, Every day, corporations are connecting the dots about our personal behavior—silently scrutinizing clues left behind by our work habits and Internet use. The data compiled and portraits created are incredibly detailed, to the point of being invasive. 

In a October 16th, 2014 op-ed in the New York Times entitled, The Dark Market for Personal Data, Pasquale suggests, We need regulation to help consumers recognize the perils of the new information landscape without being overwhelmed with data.

Media investigators are starting to inform the public that the personal data being brokered can be very personal indeed. Reports from Bloomberg indicate Tapping social media, health-related phone apps and medical websites, data aggregators are scooping up bits and pieces of tens of millions of Americans’ medical histories. Even a purchase at the pharmacy can land a shopper on a health list…People would be shocked if they knew they were on some of these lists…yet millions are.

According to the Data-Driven Marketing Institute, the data-mining industry generated $156 billion in revenue in 2012. Technology CEO and Harvard professor Nathan Eagle offers up his insight on the matter … it is just the first step for the data economy. By 2020, the global Internet population will reach five billion; ten billion new machine-to-machine connections will be created; and mobile data traffic will rise 11-fold. Given the dramatic growth in the amount of data being generated, together with ever-expanding applications across industries, it is reasonable to expect that…within ten years, the data-capture industry can be expected to generate more than $500 billion annually.

The World Privacy Forum has compiled a list of 352 consumer-focused U.S. data broker sites. Check out the list and see if you’re on any of these sites. Many of the sites offer the ability for those included to opt-out; might be a good use of your time to go through that process and engage in more privacy-centric online practices in future.

With these nefarious, data grabbing institutions at large, the urgency to protect your online data, including through use of a tool like Dodoname, has never been more real.

(Image: Flickr, Simon Cunningham, link)

Posted in: Blog, Data breach

Leave a Comment (0) →

Phone a friend: ecommerce and mcommerce are the biggest trends in retail

Phone a friend: ecommerce and mcommerce are the biggest trends in retail

By Michael Gaffney

You would have a hard time finding anyone you know who hasn’t bought something online. To drive that point home, let’s look at some stats about online shopping.

Online shopping as a sales category includes online purchases from brick-and-mortar retailers and online retailing companies such as Amazon or One Kings Lane, as well as online auctions and online daily deals companies. Also included are what’s referred to as “mixed commerce” sites such as eBay and Kijiji that are both a business-to-consumer, or B2C, transaction portal as well as a consumer-to-consumer, or C2C, transaction portal – sellers on these sites are both consumers and merchants.

The past five years saw considerable growth for the online shopping industry with a compound annual growth rate, or CAGR, exceeding 10 percent. What is most striking are the CAGR differences between in-store sales, ecommerce and mobile commerce, or mcommerce, sales. By 2017, it’s predicted by Forrester Research (and they really know their stuff) that “the web will account for 10 percent of retail sales.” Think about that: fully one dollar out of every ten spent in retail will be online. Wow.

USonlineretailforecast

Mobile commerce, or mcommerce, is relatively new evolution on the ecommerce model. In 1997, one of the first instances of mobile commerce was a Coca Cola pilot for consumers to be able to text payment for their refreshing cola to a vending machine. When the iPhone came on the scene in 2007 with its multi-touch interface, quickly followed to market by other smartphones like the Android HTC Dream in 2008, the stage was set for consumers to start buying things on their phones en masse.

And consumers are buying stuff on their phones in droves. IBM research reported in Q1 2013 that mcommerce had year-over-year growth of 31 percent.

Retailsalesgrowth

The U.S. Department of Commerce recently reported that year-over-year growth of mcommerce was now up to 47 percent, a massive increase compared to 2013.

Retailspendinggrowth

According to Google, 79 percent of smartphone owners are smartphone shoppers and 85 percent of these use their phone while in the store. These shoppers aren’t just checking their phones for FOMO (fear of missing out) on their friends’ Facebook status updates; they’re using their mobile device to help them make purchase decisions. Even more interesting is the fact that shoppers who use mobile phones buy more in the store than other consumers.

Online retail revenue in the United States is forecast at 500 billion U.S. dollars in 2018 while the number of digital buyers is expected to grow to 180 million in 2017, according to industry estimates. That’s a lot of opportunity for consumers to give up their personal information to merchants. Unless they use their Dodoname, that is. Make the online purchases you want to make, how, when and where you want to make them, without ever giving up your personal information.

(Image: Flickr, Johan Larsson, link)

 

Posted in: Blog, Privacy

Leave a Comment (0) →

This week in review: a freight train of outrage, Google on cybercrime, bad telecoms and more

This week in review: a freight train of outrage, Google on cybercrime, bad telecoms and more

By Don Dobson

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. Catching our attention this week were posts about how fast the world of advertising is changing and how little most people know about the privacy implications of tracking, more telecom snooping, Google speaks, and a few top links on phishing and malware attacks. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

Awareness lags reality in ad targeting

In digital advertising, the Holy Grail touted for driving ad performance is relevancy. That is, making sure the ads you see are relevant to you. Of course, in order to do that, advertisers need to know lots of things about you. An excellent article in The Economist notes that spending is moving rapidly from traditional media to digital formats (advertising that knows who you are) and reported on an Adobe poll that showed “most marketers say they have seen more change in the past two years than in the previous 50.” In discussing the privacy implications of it all, they quote the head of one British advertising firm who put it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.” Forbes Magazine also agrees that awareness of what is happening is not what it should be when it offered up Nine Things You Don’t Know About The Gathering Of Your Personal Data. The potential for a coming freight train of outrage is being anticipated by the advertising industry. Exactly because the technology and resulting capabilities are so powerful, they want to make sure they continue to have the ability to track you and in fact, we see AdAge reporting: Agencies Load Up on Privacy Specialists, Hoping to Keep Consumers From ‘Opting Out’

Google speaks on cybercrime – why wouldn’t we listen?

I’m told Google have the data. That’s why it is always worth listening to what they are saying; in this case, it’s a Google Security Blog entry about cybercrime. It’s Google oriented, but it confirms many of the things we have been saying about phishing leading to identity theft, how easy it is to fall prey and how quickly it can happen. All conventional emails have these security issues Google deals with but what is interesting about this post is how it paints a picture of a criminal workforce of what they call “manual hijackers” who intensively work over their victim and always use phishing emails.

Telecoms: a snooper’s best friends

We shared information with you last week about so called “super-cookies” being inserted into your web traffic by telecom providers, in particular Verizon. This is important because they introduce the notion of physical tracking to web habit tracking. Further details have emerged including the fact that it’s not only Verizon but also AT&T. It didn’t take long for news of at least one user of the technology to become known. Twitter’s mobile advertising arm, MoPub, self-described as “world’s largest mobile ad exchange,” is all over it. Privacy advocates are freaking out.

While data is good for advertisers, this type of news can’t be a good situation when you consider that even before this revelation, reports indicate that consumers are already concerned that using their mobile phone for coupon and loyalty schemes puts them at risk of identity theft. When customers aren’t happy, retailers always also have a concern.

Filthy phishers flourish

Criminals continue to innovate in their phishing attempts like a new hybrid approach seen this week in Japan. Called Huyao, which means “monstrous fox” in Chinese, experts are concerned this technique of combining legitimate sites with a fake checkout procedure is set to spread.

Meanwhile, investors and students were warned about phishing attacks targeting them, web host GoDaddy was being spoofed, we saw how just having your email leaked by companies you deal with can lead to a very effective phishing attack and a growing trend involving fake wire transfer request e-mails that can clean out your bank account.

Posted in: Blog, This week in review

Leave a Comment (0) →

Chances are your personal data has been compromised in a data breach

Chances are your personal data has been compromised in a data breach

This Throwback Thursday, let’s travel back to a simpler time, a time when the threats to your personal data online were not as frequent or severe as now. The year was 2009.

James Cameron’s groundbreaking film Avatar reigned at the box office. The world was introduced to golden-voiced singer Susan Boyle via a viral YouTube video. Yelp was emerging as one of the top iPhone apps of the year. America struggled to recover from the financial setbacks of the previous fall. And there were a mere 778 data breaches in the U.S. that year, according to a Risk Based Security and Open Security Foundation Report. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

Fast forward to today, when there’s a good chance that your personal data has been compromised in a data breach. According to a CNNMoney/Ponemon Institute study, 47 percent of U.S. adults had their personal information exposed by hackers between May 2013 and May 2014. That’s a frightening statistic to behold. And that number is likely just the tip of the iceberg; retailers are decidedly cagey when sharing with the general public, the media and their customers just what data has been leaked, and so many consumers may be victims and not even know it.

The Risk Based Security and Open Security Foundation Report for 2013 provided some additional stats about how far we’ve come since 2009 in terms of the numbers of data breaches and the amount of records impacted. According to the InfoSec Institute, “During the 2,164 incidents, nearly 822 million records were exposed.” It’s not pretty, as you can see.

Databreaches2009to2013

The stats for 2014 are still being compiled, but anecdotal evidence (Adobe, ebay, Target, JP Morgan Chase… need I go on?) would suggest that it’s on track to be the worst year ever for data breaches.

Dodoname has none of your personal information. Ergo, when you use a Dodoname to engage with a retailer, they have none of your personal information. Retailers can’t knowingly or unknowingly give up information that they don’t have. As consumers become more aware of the serious risks associated with sharing personal data with retailers, we’re hoping that they’ll be open to using Dodoname to protect themselves – and their personal information – against future data breaches. With Dodoname, consumers can get the best that the web has to offer, without exposing themselves to data breaches.

(Image: Flickr, Justgrimes, link)

Posted in: #TBT, Blog, Data breach

Leave a Comment (0) →

Ottawa entrepreneur launches “C to B” marketing platform

Ottawa entrepreneur launches “C to B” marketing platform

November 4, 2014 – Ottawa Business Journal – Calling itself the world’s first privacy marketing platform, Dodoname launched Tuesday in open beta. 

Founder Michael Gaffney says the service gives consumers the control in their online interaction with merchants. Dodoname is a spinoff of In-Touch Insight Systems, and Mr. Gaffney, the CEO of In-Touch, is, as he puts it, the “chief executive dodo” of the new company. Read more…

Posted in: Coverage

Leave a Comment (0) →

Take back control of your online identity with Dodoname

Take back control of your online identity with Dodoname

New privacy marketing platform means the end of online privacy abuse

NEW GLASGOW, NS AND OTTAWA ON – November 4, 2014 – Dodoname (www.dodoname.com), the world’s first privacy marketing platform, has launched in open beta, giving savvy consumers the power to confidently interact with merchants without compromising their online privacy.

We all deal with it, day in, day out – piles of unwanted email. From solicitations from legitimate sources, to spam and malicious phishing – most of what hits our inboxes is junk.

Why? Because we engage and interact online with our email address. And once this vital piece of information is out there, it’s defenseless against misuse.

Dodoname puts an end to this online privacy abuse. It’s the single best way to interact with merchants and vendors to get the stuff you want – and only the stuff you want – without ever revealing who you are. Your privacy and anonymity are assured.

“Merchants and marketers don’t need to know who you are to give you what you really want,” said Dodoname founder and CEO Michael Gaffney. “In the past, you had to create multiple burner email accounts to preserve some semblance of online privacy. Even then, you still had to provide a lot of personal information about yourself. Dodoname gives you true privacy, without having to jump through hoops.”

Once the Dodoname mobile app comes online in a few weeks, you will be able to manage your Dodoname account from any connected device. The only piece of information you have to provide to create your account and get started is your email, which Dodoname will not disclose to anyone else.

Consumers can use a Dodoname instead of their real email address for almost any interaction with a merchant. With your Dodoname account, you can spawn any number of unique Dodonames that are iterations of your Dodoname. For example, superman.01@dodoname.com, followed by superman.02@dodoname, and so on.

Use these Dodonames as you would a regular email address, to sign up for offers, register a warranty, receive an e-receipt, download a whitepaper, subscribe to a magazine, or for any other kind of interaction.

Dodonames can be made to go extinct after a single use, after a specific period, or on command at any time. In this way, consumers retain complete control over how, when, where – or even if – merchants can communicate with them, and can drop merchants at any time with an absolute guarantee they will never hear from them again.

What’s next?

But Dodoname is much more than just a privacy messaging service.

In the coming weeks, we will launch our merchant app. Participating merchants will be able to make personalized offers direct to Dodoname users who have opted in by completing some or all of their Dodoname persona. A persona will detail personal – but not private, identifying – information to help merchants deliver individualized offers. Consumers will retain full control over which kinds of offers they want to receive, if any, and which ones they don’t.

“With Dodoname, the consumer always calls the shots,” said Gaffney. “We give you what you want, when you want it, and when you’ve had enough, ‘no’ always means ‘no.’”

About Dodoname

Dodoname (www.dodoname.com) is world’s the first privacy marketing platform. Consumers can spawn new Dodonames on the fly, use them in place of an email address for almost any merchant interaction, and make them go extinct at any time. With Dodoname, consumers can take complete control of their online identity to confidently interact with merchants, without ever revealing who they really are. Face your inbox without fear of unwanted offers and other spam.

For more information, or to arrange an interview, please contact:

Leo Valiquette

+1 613 769 9479

Email: leo@leovaliquette.com

Twitter: @leovaliquette

Posted in: Press Release

Leave a Comment (0) →

Eight ways Dodoname gives you back control

Eight ways Dodoname gives you back control

By Michael Gaffney

1-coffeeshopwifi

1. All you wanted was a side of wifi with your java. But the coffeehouse is forcing you to cough up your email address to get access to its network. And you just know that means you’ll soon be flooded with enough offers of half-price, half-decaf, pumpkin spice lattes to choke a horse. Next time, spawn a new Dodoname, and surf that wifi with no fear of future spam. (Image: Flickr, Terry Johnston, link)

2-sandandsurf

2. It’s Autumn, and a young man’s fancy turns to thoughts of…sun. And maybe love in the warm sun. So you sign up for hot deals from your favorite travel retailers. Once you’ve decided between Montego Bay or Punta Cana, you don’t really want to hear anything further. If you used a Dodoname, you could now turn off those retailers, and then turn them back on next year when the thermometer starts to dip again. (Image: Flickr, Lady May Pamintuan, link)

3-magazines

3. That magazine subscription offer was just too good to pass up, and all you had to do to get it was give up a few bucks. And your email address. Now every single other title in the same publisher’s huge library of magazines is pounding your inbox with offers. Use a Dodoname to create a one-to-one relationship with just the title you want, and make that address go extinct if the rest of the publishing house gloms on to it. (Image: Flickr , Ken Hawkins, link)

4-whitepaper

4. You wanted that whitepaper? You got that whitepaper. And you got an ongoing close and personal email relationship with the sponsor of that whitepaper. Next time, use a Dodoname configured to go extinct in a day. You want that whitepaper? Get that whitepaper. And get absolutely nothing else. (Image: Flickr, Locus Research, link)

5-warranty

5. Warranties. Who needs ’em? Certainly not you. Until you do. But if you register it, your purchase may be protected, but your inbox won’t be. Use a Dodoname with an extinction date, get the reply email acknowledging your warranty registration, tag it “warranty” to make it super simple to find it in the future, and then forget all about all that follow-on marketing email. (The company calls it “marketing.” You call it “spam.”) (Image: Flickr, Mike, link)

6-emailedreceipt

6. Remember the last time you were asked at the checkout if you wanted your receipt emailed to you? “Great idea,” one side of your brain said; that would make it so easy to keep the receipt handy in case I need to do a return. “Lousy idea,” the other side of your brain said; if I give them my email address, they’ll just spam me. Which side won out? You really shouldn’t have to fight it out between good and evil, and now you don’t. Use a Dodoname, tag the emailed receipted for quick search and retrieval, and never worry about the evil of unwanted spam. (Image, Flickr, Consumerist Dot Com, link)

shutterstock_186817148

7. The organizers of that webinar you registered for were great about sending you valuable updates, reminders and even a link to the presentation slides afterwards. And then they were just as great about sending you more and more emails about their next great webinar, trying to up-sell you into their product suite, and bringing you “valuable promotions from one of our trusted partners.” Next time, register for the webinar using a Dodoname programmed to go extinct in 30 days. You’ll get all the emails you want and need, and none of what you don’t want and don’t need. (Image: Shutterstock)

8-spam

8. Your favorite retailer has promised that if you sign up to receive regular offers and updates, that they’ll totally respect your privacy. Do you believe them? Even if they are true to their word, spambots are gonna auto-generate that email address you gave them and pound your inbox. With Dodoname, spambots can’t even get through our servers because of the one-to-one relationship between a Dodoname and a specific sender. And if your favorite retailer breaks its e-promise to you, shut ’em down, deactivate that Dodoname, and they’ll just have to leave you alone. (Image: Flickr, Mike Mozart, link)

Posted in: Blog, Email, Fraud, Privacy, Spam, Unsubscribe

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 3 of 5 12345