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9 Dodoname Privacy Protection Tips for Online Daters

9 Dodoname Privacy Protection Tips for Online Daters
  1. Never share your first or last name, telephone number, address, place of work, or any other personally identifiable information.
  2. Share information about yourself without providing specifics that could allow somebody to identify you.
  3. Ensure that any digital photos that you post do not have metadata in them.
  4. Always pick a different username between different dating sites and never reuse a username between personal/business sites and a dating site.
  5. Always read the privacy policy.  Leave the site if you don’t like what you read.
  6. Always review and change the default settings and filters on the dating site and set up the controls that meet your needs. Assume the default settings are never they way you want them to be.
  7. Never ever send money.
  8. Fabricated information on a resume is an unfortunate fact and the same happens on a dating site. Do whatever you can to validate or background check before you meet someone.
  9. Always use Dodonames. Never use your regular email address.

Posted in: Anonymity, Identity, Online Dating, Privacy

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Focus your email to protect your privacy and stay safe online.

Focus your email to protect your privacy and stay safe online.

If you are concerned about identify theft and other privacy/security concerns there is a simple email precaution you can take to protect yourself. How about – never give out your personal or business email to someone or business you don’t know?

Sounds like common sense, does it not – yet, we do it all the time! Every day we sign up for newsletters; give our email to a point of sale clerk; register for online dating; use it to get WiFi at the coffee shop or airport; register for coupons, daily deal sites and freely hand out our email address in many other situations where we don’t know the people or business. Don’t do it! Protect your privacy and stop identity theft.

Never give your personal or business email address to people or businesses you don’t know. Privacy invasions and identity theft, in most cases, start with an email address. Your personal or business email address is the key to the front door of your digital house.  Why would you ever share that key with every supplier you can think of and risk identity theft?

Little Known Fact About the Selling of Email Addresses.

Many companies have no problem selling email addresses while at the same time agreeing not to spam you. You unsubscribe from their mailing list but not from their selling list! Conclusion: Protect your privacy, don’t let your personal email get on their list in the first place

However easy it is to say, ‘never share your email with people and businesses you don’t know’, in reality we actually need to maintain a digital communications with many of these folks. Many of us simply create another email address, ‘our spam address’, in gmail, yahoo or hotmail.  We end up with another inbox that is full of spam and also contains lots of legitimate communication.

Dodoname – Privacy by Design.

Enter Dodoname, which was designed specifically for when you don’t want to use your regular email address and also want a way to start, manage and stop all these ‘other emails’.

Remember, stop identity theft, never give out your regular email address again to someone to don’t know – use a Dodoname.

Posted in: Anonymity, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Privacy, Uncategorized

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The Right to Know When I Am Not Left Alone – Is Not Enough.

The Right to Know When I Am Not Left Alone – Is Not Enough.

Our online privacy is continuously compromised with the scanning, skimming and scraping of our emails and our browsing behavior.

A recent study concluded that 92% of the population believes “that collecting the content of emails is unacceptable”. How many consumers understand that virtually every email is scanned, skimmed and scraped for information and their privacy is breached every day? A recent article in The Economist describes how people do not protect their right to privacy and anonymity.

Google scans the content of all emails on its servers as well as all emails sent or received by a gmail account. Google considers that users have no ‘reasonable expectation’ of privacy. This stance flies in the face of the predominant and consistent research about consumers’ ‘privacy expectations’.

Rami Essaid recently wrote in TechCrunch that, “The truth is, people will never achieve true privacy and anonymity online.” He concludes that tracking is here to stay and that it is getting more pervasive and sophisticated. His main thesis is that our discussion should not be about absolute the right to privacy or anonymity but about transparency.

If Essaid is correct, the horse has left the barn in terms of protecting our privacy and anonymity. Instead, he proposes focusing on making it visible and transparent about how our online privacy will be accessed or ripped off.  It is OK to to invade our privacy as long as it is transparent! Should consumers simply give up that they have any expectation for online privacy? This is almost Orwellian in concept – a dark road that we must not travel as this means that others have the right to observe us without our consent!

The Right to Privacy

In 1890, Warren and Brandeis wrote The Right to Privacy and their key argument was the “right to be let alone”. Here we are 100 years later. Do we really want to change the right to be left alone to the “the right to know when I am not left alone?” Transparency is an important need but we must not give up the fight for the right to privacy.

Posted in: Anonymity, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Phishing, Privacy, Uncategorized

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Digital identity = digital currency

Digital identity = digital currency

By Michael Gaffney

Your digital identity is currency. It can be monetized. In an increasingly complex digital society, one of the biggest challenges for businesses is how to capture that identity.

Currently, totally beyond the control of consumers, a myriad of technologies and companies are scraping data, watching online activity, phishing, and working tirelessly to reveal – sometimes even steal – your digital identity. Your “digital identity” is the sum of all the available information about you and is growing exponentially; at the same time, big data capabilities are keeping pace in an effort to analyze all this information, your information.

The evolution of digital identities is a concern for consumers and merchants alike. On the one hand, consumers are concerned about privacy and losing control over their personal data. On the other hand, companies are increasing worried about data breaches – be it their own or third-party applications and the effects on breaking the trusted relationship between merchants and consumers.

In February 2014, it was reported in Forbes that the cost of the data breach at Target was $61 million. Target cautioned investors, “At this time, the company is not able to estimate future expenses related to the data breach.” The breach at Target, resulting in the loss of tens of millions of digital identities has had a massive impact on value for its shareholders, not to mention consumer confidence.

It’s cold comfort for Target and the shoppers impacted that at least they’re not alone, as evidenced by this infographic of the World’s Biggest Data Breaches.

The growth rate for ecommerce far exceeds traditional economies, whose growth rates are flat to shrinking. Consumer trust is one of the cornerstones of commerce for a merchant, especially in this age of digital identities. The ecommerce world with its real-time availability, product reviews and ability to rapidly provide consumers with substitute products is a dangerous place for merchants who cannot generate trust in their products and their interactions with consumers. Protecting the digital identity of consumers is paramount to maintaining that trust.

Opt-out is considered standard practice – in fact it is legislated in many jurisdictions – as a way for consumers to control their private data. Opt-in is typically used when the data required is even more sensitive. Studies have shown that consumers want control of their data but there is juxtaposition against convenience.

Consumers are willing to share their data with private and public organizations – conditional upon privacy controls and sufficient currency benefits. Trust, plus deals that consumers like, will cause them to spend and invest in their digital identities for the merchant’s currency.

For merchants to engage the consumer – to cause them share their digital identity to unlock value – companies need to epitomize and communicate a new digital identity perspective of — responsibility, transparency and the consumer in control.

(Image: flickr, Alan O’Rourke, link)

Posted in: Blog, Data breach, Identity

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Top five online privacy concerns

Top five online privacy concerns

By Don Dobson

In epidemiology, the means for the transmission of disease is termed a “vector.” In the world of online privacy, your personal email address is one of the prime vectors by which your privacy can be compromised. If you’re not using a Dodoname to interact with merchants, you’re leaving yourself open to these top five privacy concerns (which can have some very scary repercussions!)

1. Phishing

Wikipedia defines phishing as the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money) by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.

Although not the only means, email is one of the main vectors for phishing. At Dodoname, we like to keep up to date on the latest developments in cybercrime through email phishing scams. We see that the scammers are relentless and that anyone can be a victim: criminals shamelessly exploit the latest news, such as recent attempts linked to the Ebola scare gripping the world or even attack children. It also a big problem for businesses as employees can be fooled and surrender corporate information or provide a pathway for hacking of retailer systems.

Phishing still thrives because it remains a simple game and the power of easily sending millions of emails every day allows the bad guys to fill their quotas. Old scams are still making the rounds and claiming victims. And the fact is, email remains a very popular communication channel. Unfortunately, it’s true that real dangers can place themselves in your inbox. Here’s a start on some help to stay out of trouble and also some advice if you have taken the bait.

2. Data breaches

Retailers in particular have shown themselves to be vulnerable to hacker attacks which result in a “breach” of security measures protecting customer data, as have financial institutions.

You may think “that’s their problem” but it could also be a problem for you. Depending on the nature of the data breach, personal information you have shared with companies, including credit card information, may become available for use by criminals and/or be re-sold in criminal markets. Ironically, this can result in even more effective phishing emails as criminals use information already stolen to become more credible to email recipients in what is known as “spear-fishing.”

There is nothing you can do to prevent these breaches, but they are the top of the list of concerns for company executives. Customers are striking back. Many consumers will stop patronizing companies who have had a data breach while some victims of these attacks  have joined lawsuits against retailers like Home Depot.

3. Malware

Email phishing can have many consequences. One of those is the installation of malware on your device. There are many varieties of malware “in-the-wild,” some malicious, some not so much, but none have any business on your device. Among the types of malware that can impact you are “key-loggers,” which send back everything you type online to criminals. This information would include details of all your online activity including banking website passwords.

And the thing is, you don’t always even need to click on anything. Just visiting some sites exposes you to these sneaky downloads through “malvertising.” You might think that staying away from seedy corners of the Internet would protect you, but the truth is even reputable sites can be hacked in these ways through ad exchanges.

4. Identity theft

Identity thieves have many different ways to strike: over the phone or through something as low-tech as criminals sifting through your trash, or through email phishing attacks. Online theft of personal identity and it has become a major problem worldwide. Criminals can use your identity and credit card information to make purchases, take out loans or conduct any illicit financial transaction.

Identity thieves can be individuals at the local level or international organized criminal operations. Even using free wi-fi at a coffee shop can open you up to identity theft. It’s clear that these types of cybercrime enterprises are a growth business.

5. Data brokers

A much broader concern for personal privacy than the vector of phishing emails and malware criminals is an industry that operates “legitimately” but without much regulatory protection for consumers. Testimony by Pam Dixon, Executive Director, World Privacy Forum appearing before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, suggests that somewhere around 4,000 companies in the U.S. gather identity information left by the “digital exhaust” of your online activity. Dixon cites real harm to individuals resulting from these activities and notes “Despite the large and growing size of the industry, until this Committee started its work, this entire industry largely escaped public scrutiny. Privacy laws apply to credit bureaus and health care providers, but data broker activity generally falls outside these laws. Even a knowledgeable consumer lacks the tools to exercise any control over his or her data held by a data broker.” 

(Image: Flickr, Sebastien Wiertz, link)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in: Blog, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Phishing, Privacy

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