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Use Dodoname to Stop Phishing Attacks. | phishing, privacy, email

Use Dodoname to Stop Phishing Attacks. | phishing, privacy, email

“A woman in the UK has been scammed out of her life savings through a simple phishing email orchestrated by cyber criminals.” Yahoo June 29, 2015.

On March 19 I wrote a blog – ‘Identity theft and who has the keys to your virtual house?’ It was inspired by a story about a neighbor of mine who was about to make the same terrible mistake as this unfortunate woman in the UK.

Creating a Dodoname account and using a Dodoname email address could have eliminated the phishing problem in both cases. Phishers endeavor make themselves look like a legitimate enterprise that you would normally transact business with – such as your bank or eBay. The first key to the phisher is to get your email address. Once they have your email address they can try to insert themselves into your daily communications by mimicking the legitimate business and eventually trying to gain your trust and trick you into handing over money or private information.

Using a Dodoname email address would have gone a long way to stopping the risk of these phishing attacks – and other invasions of your privacy. Your first line of defence against phishers is to use a Dodoname email address whenever you register for any online service. Because of Dodoname’s ‘matched sender’ feature, a phishers’ attempt to use this email would simply fail. A Dodoname email address is of no use to phishers, spammers, and scammers. Not only does Dodoname give you have privacy and freedom on the Internet but your inbox gets dramatically cleaned out of spam.

Remember, never give out your real email address again – use a Dodoname email address. Dodoname is you personal privacy manager.

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9 Dodoname Privacy Protection Tips for Online Daters

9 Dodoname Privacy Protection Tips for Online Daters
  1. Never share your first or last name, telephone number, address, place of work, or any other personally identifiable information.
  2. Share information about yourself without providing specifics that could allow somebody to identify you.
  3. Ensure that any digital photos that you post do not have metadata in them.
  4. Always pick a different username between different dating sites and never reuse a username between personal/business sites and a dating site.
  5. Always read the privacy policy.  Leave the site if you don’t like what you read.
  6. Always review and change the default settings and filters on the dating site and set up the controls that meet your needs. Assume the default settings are never they way you want them to be.
  7. Never ever send money.
  8. Fabricated information on a resume is an unfortunate fact and the same happens on a dating site. Do whatever you can to validate or background check before you meet someone.
  9. Always use Dodonames. Never use your regular email address.

Posted in: Anonymity, Identity, Online Dating, Privacy

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Focus your email to protect your privacy and stay safe online.

Focus your email to protect your privacy and stay safe online.

If you are concerned about identify theft and other privacy/security concerns there is a simple email precaution you can take to protect yourself. How about – never give out your personal or business email to someone or business you don’t know?

Sounds like common sense, does it not – yet, we do it all the time! Every day we sign up for newsletters; give our email to a point of sale clerk; register for online dating; use it to get WiFi at the coffee shop or airport; register for coupons, daily deal sites and freely hand out our email address in many other situations where we don’t know the people or business. Don’t do it! Protect your privacy and stop identity theft.

Never give your personal or business email address to people or businesses you don’t know. Privacy invasions and identity theft, in most cases, start with an email address. Your personal or business email address is the key to the front door of your digital house.  Why would you ever share that key with every supplier you can think of and risk identity theft?

Little Known Fact About the Selling of Email Addresses.

Many companies have no problem selling email addresses while at the same time agreeing not to spam you. You unsubscribe from their mailing list but not from their selling list! Conclusion: Protect your privacy, don’t let your personal email get on their list in the first place

However easy it is to say, ‘never share your email with people and businesses you don’t know’, in reality we actually need to maintain a digital communications with many of these folks. Many of us simply create another email address, ‘our spam address’, in gmail, yahoo or hotmail.  We end up with another inbox that is full of spam and also contains lots of legitimate communication.

Dodoname – Privacy by Design.

Enter Dodoname, which was designed specifically for when you don’t want to use your regular email address and also want a way to start, manage and stop all these ‘other emails’.

Remember, stop identity theft, never give out your regular email address again to someone to don’t know – use a Dodoname.

Posted in: Anonymity, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Privacy, Uncategorized

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The Right to Know When I Am Not Left Alone – Is Not Enough.

The Right to Know When I Am Not Left Alone – Is Not Enough.

Our online privacy is continuously compromised with the scanning, skimming and scraping of our emails and our browsing behavior.

A recent study concluded that 92% of the population believes “that collecting the content of emails is unacceptable”. How many consumers understand that virtually every email is scanned, skimmed and scraped for information and their privacy is breached every day? A recent article in The Economist describes how people do not protect their right to privacy and anonymity.

Google scans the content of all emails on its servers as well as all emails sent or received by a gmail account. Google considers that users have no ‘reasonable expectation’ of privacy. This stance flies in the face of the predominant and consistent research about consumers’ ‘privacy expectations’.

Rami Essaid recently wrote in TechCrunch that, “The truth is, people will never achieve true privacy and anonymity online.” He concludes that tracking is here to stay and that it is getting more pervasive and sophisticated. His main thesis is that our discussion should not be about absolute the right to privacy or anonymity but about transparency.

If Essaid is correct, the horse has left the barn in terms of protecting our privacy and anonymity. Instead, he proposes focusing on making it visible and transparent about how our online privacy will be accessed or ripped off.  It is OK to to invade our privacy as long as it is transparent! Should consumers simply give up that they have any expectation for online privacy? This is almost Orwellian in concept – a dark road that we must not travel as this means that others have the right to observe us without our consent!

The Right to Privacy

In 1890, Warren and Brandeis wrote The Right to Privacy and their key argument was the “right to be let alone”. Here we are 100 years later. Do we really want to change the right to be left alone to the “the right to know when I am not left alone?” Transparency is an important need but we must not give up the fight for the right to privacy.

Posted in: Anonymity, Data breach, Email, Fraud, Identity, Phishing, Privacy, Uncategorized

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Identity theft and who has the keys to your virtual house?

Identity theft and who has the keys to your virtual house?

We were moving out of the neighborhood where we have lived for the past 23 years. Tracy, our neighbor, invited us over for a farewell dinner.  Tracy knows that I have been in technology for a long time and related the story of her recent identity theft where the thieves came very close to emptying her bank account. It started with the bad guys phishing and finding her personal email address. This data breach and cybercrime was incredibly invasive to Tracy as she now had to get rid of the personal email address she had used for over twenty years.

 

The front door to our virtual house, hence our privacy, is our personal email address. It seems we give this email address to everybody. Concerned about their privacy, many consumers simply get a second or third email they use as their ‘spam address’ – typically a Hotmail or Gmail address. So now we have two or three front doors to our virtual house. Susie Baszkeiwicz blogged in January about 9 reasons you should have more than one email address. Avoid spam & hackers, protect yourself, have a disposable email, have an alias and have a backup are 5 of her 9 reasons that we built Dodoname.

How many of us would hand out the keys to our front, side and back door of our regular house to every merchant or supplier who said, “I won’t sell to you unless you give me the keys to your house.” If that seems a little insane in the real world then why do we do it in the virtual world?

Consider that identify theft is a Type I invasion of our privacy and that spam is a Type II invasion of our privacy. Clearly a Type I privacy breach is more serious than Type II privacy breach.

For Type I protection most consumers continue to use their personal email address – the less secure email address. Why? Because there is no easy way to manage our secondary emails, which are filled with spam, and not really the place we want to collect and manager our ‘good’ communications. We shrug our shoulders and continue to use our personal email addresses for the really important stuff. The phishers know this. Consumers should understand what phishing is and how to protect themselves. Read this article from the Safety & Security Center at Microsoft for more information about how to protect yourself.

Using a Dodoname for key confidential registrations would eliminate much of the risk because a Dodoname can only ever be used by that one service. Moreover, the managed email system in Dodoname provides users with a powerful way to store and manage confidential communications. Finally, Dodoname is also designed as a marketplace where merchants and consumers can meet, sell and buy with confidence that the consumer’s private information is protected. Privacy with Personalization is the core architectural feature of Dodoname. Everyone should have a Dodoname.

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2015 is the year of the sheep. And of personalization.

2015 is the year of the sheep. And of personalization.

2015 is the year of the sheep, according to the Chinese zodiac. And it’s also the year of personalization, according to several authors (DeGiovanni, Holobach, Ballance, Shandwick). The imagery of too many merchants treating their consumers like sheep is compelling. Chinese New Year was only a few weeks ago so marketers should make a resolution to stop treating their customers like sheep.

Too often, we consumers feel like we are just another one, an invisible consumer, a sheep. What we really want is to feel like we are the one, the only. Even just a little different would be fine. Consumer oneness is the core of personalization.

Personalization is hard. There are so many sheep that need to be categorized that most marketers simply give in to batch and blast email marketing. Of course, the sheep metaphor is demeaning to consumers but even more demeaning is for marketers to treat us like sheep.

Consumer personalization is hard because of the almost infinite number of individual differences between consumers. Trying to solve for infinity is intractable – a boil-the-ocean problem. Any sales pitch from a personalization product supplier promising ‘the’ solution is simply false.

Marketers should focus on a bite-sized personalization problem to start with, and expand or change as solutions reveal their efficacy. Moreover, this approach reduces costs, risks and provides flexibility and adaptability. What would be your choice of message to the C-suite; “We’re locked in to this solution,” or, “We’re adapting as we go”? Your efficacy as a marketer is closely aligned to your tenure with the firm.

Capturing actionable data about consumers is the marketer’s Holy Grail. Primary data where information about a consumer is generated by and shared by the consumers themselves is invaluable compared to secondary scraped data sources. Battlefield data is always superior to boardroom data. Primary data directly from a consumer implies that the consumer is in control. Give consumers direct control over their own information and the sheep become wolves. This is a big-time move up the food chain for a marketer.

The Dodoname consumer Persona is designed to provide marketers with primary data. In Dodoname, the consumer is motivated to provide this information because of the inherent reward structure built into the system. Dodoname guarantees the privacy of the consumer with the currency for that privacy being the completion of their Persona. It’s a win-win for the sheep turned to wolf consumers because they can “Get the stuff they want without revealing who they are.”

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The week in review: the FTC on IoT at CES, ringing in a new year of data breaches and phishing scams

The week in review: the FTC on IoT at CES, ringing in a new year of data breaches and phishing scams

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. This week, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas highlighted the growing interest in privacy as well as the privacy impacts of the Internet of Things, ringing in the new year of data breaches, and new phishing schemes for a new year. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

The FTC on IoT + CES = big privacy news

This week, technology companies big and small gathered in Las Vegas to tout their wares and reveal to consumers worldwide the next wave of consumer electronics. At the Consumer Electronics Show 2015, privacy was big news, both on the show floor and on the main stage.

The Internet of Things is a hot topic these days: from connected smoke alarms to intelligent refrigerators, futurists – and technology companies – are betting on the fact that soon most of our world will be connected to the Internet. This brave new world, however, has serious implications for consumer privacy.

The chairwoman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission gave a keynote address at CES this week highlighting the privacy and security implications of IoT, and her speech got a lot of coverage in both tech and mainstream media.

“Connected devices that provide increased convenience and improve health services are also collecting, transmitting, storing, and often sharing vast amounts of consumer data, some of it highly personal, thereby creating a number of privacy risks,” she said.

This creates an opportunity, of course, for technology companies to help solve those challenges, as evidenced by the small but mighty group of privacy-focused technology providers exhibiting on the CES show floor.

Brace for a busy year of data breaches

2014 was a remarkable year for data breaches, with seemingly no corner of the retail and consumer worlds untouched by the hand of hackers and poor security systems and policies. Well, I’ve got some bad news for you: experts are predicting that 2015 could be even worse. From the Sony hack that arguably touched off international cyberwar at a magnitude never before seen to financial institutions and retail giants suffering legal action and penalties as an unprecedented rate, these are just the tip of the iceberg for what could be about to unfold in 2015.

As Forbes reported in its harbinger of the data breach potential for 2015: “…a recent study found that more than 40% of companies experienced a data breach of some sort in the past year – four out of ten companies that maintain your credit card numbers, social security numbers, health information, and other personal information.  That number is staggering, and shows no signs of retreat.”

Fast food restaurant Chick-Fil-A (which has had troubles of a different sort in recent years based on its political and religious affiliations) has the dubious distinction of being the first reported data breach of 2015. Congratulations?

What’s good on Netflix? Not the phish. Try Friends instead.

Online streaming service Netflix has fallen victim to one of the first reported phishing scams of 2015. Netflix subscribers are being targeted with the old account verification phishing scheme. Some subscribers are reporting receiving notification that their payment has failed and that they need to log in to provide updated payment details. Let’s resolve to try and not fall victim to these sorts of tactics in 2015, shall we?

 

Posted in: Blog, Data breach, Phishing, Privacy, This week in review

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Classic relationship marketing diminishes the privacy of the consumer

Classic relationship marketing diminishes the privacy of the consumer

By Michael Gaffney

Privacy research firm, Pew Research, in the “The Future of Privacy” reported that ‘Internet privacy is a fantasy’ and that 55 percent of the population don’t believe that a ‘privacy-rights infrastructure by 2025 that allows for business innovation and monetization while also offering individuals choices for protecting their personal information in easy-to-use formats’ is achievable. We all need to remember that the remaining 45 percent is still a very large number.

Most disruptive events, political, social or technological, come from a tiny percentage of the population evoking a cause or an entrepreneur creating something new and needed. Dr. Martin Luther King and Steve Jobs were but two people in that 45 percent determined to make a change and they were quite disruptive to say the least. The doom and gloom naysayers who write provocative headlines like ‘privacy is a fantasy’ should provide motivation for the 45 percent who are concerned about privacy.

Relationship marketing is a relatively new phenomenon. It evolved out of the 1960’s when consumers began to have more competitive product alternatives to choose from and where there was sustained demand for those products. Merchants had to change from being focusing on the economics of supply to focus on demand. The foundations of what came to be known as relationship marketing – customer recruitment, retention and satisfaction – became the dominant focus of marketers for the past 50 years.

However, relationship marketing has seriously diminished privacy of the consumer. Why? Because by definition a ‘relationship’ typically means some form of intimate knowledge of the other party – in this case the consumer. In marketing terms, it means that the merchant, to effectively market to a consumer, needs lots of information about that consumer. Consumer data is captured, typically without prior knowledge or consent, in a number of ways by merchants. Facebook, Google and other social media sites have only accelerated the loss of privacy. Moreover, corporate customer relationship management (CRM) systems appear to be failing regularly in terms of data breaches and CRM’s are the key repositories of customer information.

So, what are consumers to do given all the scraping of our private information and the data breaches from CRM’s? Privacy and security have been foundations of society as long as we humans have been on the planet. Privacy is complex. We want privacy from our governments; privacy from the prying eyes of the public – especially if you are famous; privacy and protection from the bad guys; and privacy and protection from the merchants that hound us. Dodoname was created to address privacy from merchants and other consumer to business transactions and help address the risk of your data being stolen in a data breach.

How does Dodoname resolve relationship marketing and the loss of privacy? First of all, we designed a system that starts with the consumer in control of their personal and private information. Second, we designed a system that does not even capture your private information – only personal information. What is the difference between private and personal information? Private information is your actual name, street address, telephone number, credit card and banking information. Personal information is your sex, age (not birth date), postal code, married/single, likes, hobbies, etc. At Dodoname, we call the collection of your personal information your Persona. Remember, your Persona never includes your private information. Marketers don’t really need your private information if they have your Persona information. Hackers can hack us all they want but they can’t get what we don’t have. Relationship marketing and its problems with privacy breaches is solved when Consumers use Dodonames and Merchants market to Dodonames.

(Image: Flickr, Bernard Goldbach, link)

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in: Blog, Persona, Privacy

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Digital identity = digital currency

Digital identity = digital currency

By Michael Gaffney

Your digital identity is currency. It can be monetized. In an increasingly complex digital society, one of the biggest challenges for businesses is how to capture that identity.

Currently, totally beyond the control of consumers, a myriad of technologies and companies are scraping data, watching online activity, phishing, and working tirelessly to reveal – sometimes even steal – your digital identity. Your “digital identity” is the sum of all the available information about you and is growing exponentially; at the same time, big data capabilities are keeping pace in an effort to analyze all this information, your information.

The evolution of digital identities is a concern for consumers and merchants alike. On the one hand, consumers are concerned about privacy and losing control over their personal data. On the other hand, companies are increasing worried about data breaches – be it their own or third-party applications and the effects on breaking the trusted relationship between merchants and consumers.

In February 2014, it was reported in Forbes that the cost of the data breach at Target was $61 million. Target cautioned investors, “At this time, the company is not able to estimate future expenses related to the data breach.” The breach at Target, resulting in the loss of tens of millions of digital identities has had a massive impact on value for its shareholders, not to mention consumer confidence.

It’s cold comfort for Target and the shoppers impacted that at least they’re not alone, as evidenced by this infographic of the World’s Biggest Data Breaches.

The growth rate for ecommerce far exceeds traditional economies, whose growth rates are flat to shrinking. Consumer trust is one of the cornerstones of commerce for a merchant, especially in this age of digital identities. The ecommerce world with its real-time availability, product reviews and ability to rapidly provide consumers with substitute products is a dangerous place for merchants who cannot generate trust in their products and their interactions with consumers. Protecting the digital identity of consumers is paramount to maintaining that trust.

Opt-out is considered standard practice – in fact it is legislated in many jurisdictions – as a way for consumers to control their private data. Opt-in is typically used when the data required is even more sensitive. Studies have shown that consumers want control of their data but there is juxtaposition against convenience.

Consumers are willing to share their data with private and public organizations – conditional upon privacy controls and sufficient currency benefits. Trust, plus deals that consumers like, will cause them to spend and invest in their digital identities for the merchant’s currency.

For merchants to engage the consumer – to cause them share their digital identity to unlock value – companies need to epitomize and communicate a new digital identity perspective of — responsibility, transparency and the consumer in control.

(Image: flickr, Alan O’Rourke, link)

Posted in: Blog, Data breach, Identity

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The week in review: international cyberwarfare, the cost of data breaches and the future of privacy

The week in review: international cyberwarfare, the cost of data breaches and the future of privacy

By Don Dobson

In our weekly roundup, we draw your attention to selected news and articles that highlight issues relating to invasions of your online privacy and threats to the security of your personal data, including problems that Dodoname can help solve. The Sony hack was catching everyone’s attention this week, banks and retailers are arguing about footing the data breach bill and there is some new thought provoking research on our digital lives and where we are going with privacy. For all our privacy, security and personal data related posts follow @MyDodoname on Twitter.

Truth is stranger than fiction

While “The Interview” is a screwball comedy based on a highly improbable scenario, even Hollywood could not have written the script we see playing out with the Sony hack. Reports indicate that the data breach of terabytes of all manner of data (including employee personal data) at Sony was, in fact, carried out by North Korea. While state-on-state cyberwar is certainly not the personal privacy milieu of Dodoname, there are some sobering implications of the Sony hack which are likely to reverberate across business, in what may come to be seen as a real turning point for how we look at cybersecurity.

North Korea’s Bureau 121 is certainly not the only hacker group out there. In previous weeks we shared posts about how criminal hacking was a major industry in some places. A Monday post by Robert Beckhusen and Matthew Gault suggested that it wasn’t cyberwar that we need to be worried about but cybercrime, since the U.S. — and the rest of the world, for that matter — aren’t ready to deal with cybercrime. As they point out, cybercrime is often stateless. Hackers operate across borders.

When we get to the point where Crimeware-as-a-Service Threatens Banks, The Economist notes in regard to cybercrime that the growth in general wickedness online is testing the police, and underground hacker markets are peddling complete kits for hackers monetizing every piece of data they can steal or buy and are adding services, it starts to feel like, whether we like it or not, 2015 will be a watershed year for cybersecurity. With polls reporting that almost half of Americans say their card details have been stolen in a data breach, it is also no surprise to see observers suggesting that protecting consumers’ data should be at top of new Congress’ agenda.

Who pays the bill?

As the cost of data breaches starts to explode, there is mounting tension between retailers and card issuers. Banking and Credit Union association officials Jim Nussle and Camden R. Fine note the instant criminal hackers gain access to consumer financial data, they sell the information to the highest bidders. Protecting the consumer then becomes the duty of financial institutions—leaving banks and credit unions on the hook for fronting the bill. Their industry feels it’s time for retailers to join efforts to put a stop to data breaches and protect the consumer. Current U.S. laws on data protection for retailers are not as strict as financial institutions and as a result there is little incentive to address their security flaws, because financial institutions are responsible for cleaning up their mess. We expect that retailers will face increased liability as laws are almost certain to change, highlighting the potential value to retailers of participating in a privacy marketing platform like Dodoname.

The future of privacy

The Pew Research Center Internet & American Life Project aims to be an authoritative source on the evolution of the Internet through surveys that examine how Americans use the Internet and how their activities affect their lives. They canvassed thousands (2,511) of experts and Internet builders to share their predictions on the future of privacy and released the results of those efforts this week.

In theintro to the report, Pew notes “The terms of citizenship and social life are rapidly changing in the digital age. No issue highlights this any better than privacy, always a fluid and context-situated concept and more so now as the boundary between being private and being public is shifting.

We recommend the entire report as a fascinating read. It reveals that, while we all can see benefits in our ever increasing digital lifestyle, privacy does mean something. However, it’s moving so fast that all parties are struggling to decide what it does mean and where it is going. Lots of food for thought for sure, but you won’t find a simple consensus. A taste of what we mean follows and do check out the full report.

We are at a crossroads,” noted Vytautas Butrimas, the chief adviser to a major government’s ministry. He added a quip from a colleague who has watched the rise of surveillance in all forms, who proclaimed, “George Orwell may have been an optimist,” in imagining “Big Brother.”

An executive at an Internet top-level domain name operator who preferred to remain anonymous replied, “Big data equals big business. Those special interests will continue to block any effective public policy work to ensure security, liberty, and privacy online.”

John Wilbanks, chief commons officer for Sage Bionetworks, wrote, “We have never had ubiquitous surveillance before, much less a form of ubiquitous surveillance that emerges primarily from voluntary (if market-obscured) choices. Predicting how it shakes out is just fantasy.”

An information science professional responded, “Individuals are willing to give up privacy for the reasons of ease, fastness, and convenience… If anything, consumer tracking will increase, and almost all data entered online will be considered ‘fair game’ for purposes of analytics and producing ‘user-driven’ ads. Privacy is an archaic term when used in reference to depositing information online.

Joe Kochan, chief operating officer for US Ignite, a company developing gigabit-ready digital experiences and applications, observed, “I do not believe that there is a ‘right balance’ between privacy, security, and compelling content. This will need to be a constantly negotiated balance—one that will swing too far in one direction or another with each iteration… Public norms will continue to trend toward the desire for more privacy, while people’s actions will tend toward giving up more and more control over their data.”

Posted in: Data breach, Privacy, Spam, This week in review

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